top_1_963_35.JPG
top_2_1.jpg top_2_2.jpg
 
 
  HOME   PUBLISH   DONATE   ABOUT   CONTACT   HELP   SEARCH  
 
   
Awakening Warrior
Revolution in the Ethics of Warfare
Awakening Warrior
Click on image to enlarge

Timothy L. Challans - Author
SUNY series, Ethics and the Military Profession
Price: $74.50 
Hardcover - 243 pages
Release Date: May 2007
ISBN10: 0-7914-7125-X
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-7125-8

Quantity:  
Price: $31.95 
Paperback - 243 pages
Release Date: May 2007
ISBN10: 0-7914-7126-8
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-7126-5

Quantity:  
Available as a Google eBook
for other eReaders and tablet devices.
Click icon below...

Available as a Kindle Edition.
Click icon below...


Summary Read First Chapter image missing

2007 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title

Explores moral progress in the American military.

Awakening Warrior argues for a revolution in the ethics of warfare for the American War Machine—those political and military institutions that engage the world with physical force. Timothy L. Challans focuses on the systemic, institutional level of morality rather than bemoaning the moral shortcomings of individuals. He asks: What are the limits of individual moral agency? What kind of responsibility do individuals have when considering institutional moral error? How is it that neutral or benign moral actions performed by individuals can have such catastrophic morally negative effects from a systemic perspective? Drawing upon and extending the ethical theories of Kant, Dewey, and Rawls, Challans makes the case for an original set of moral principles to guide ethical action on the battlefield.

“…[Challans’s] call for reformation combined with a demand for a new set of moral principles to govern the ethical behavior on the battlefield is certain to garner the attention and ire of many readers and military leaders.” — Parameters

“This is an important book that needs to be read and taken seriously. If it is, it could be as revolutionary as its subtitle suggests.” — CHOICE

“Challans has written a trenchant, robust, and deeply informed critique of current military morality. He attacks the heavily religious slant given to the moral instruction of warriors, the dogmatic reliance on the idea that the sole end of war is victory, and the refusal to teach even officers to think for themselves about the moral issues raised by their profession. Drawing on years of active duty and of teaching ethics at West Point and other military schools, Challans presents positive recommendations for reforming codes of military ethics and methods of teaching them to young soldiers. The book will no doubt infuriate many of the military leaders who are its chief target. It has policy implications going beyond their concerns, however, and it deserves the thoughtful attention of all citizens who are disturbed by the moral lapses of the American military in the past few decades.” — J. B. Schneewind, author of The Invention of Autonomy: A History of Modern Moral Philosophy

“Many in the military community will find Challans’s criticism of the U.S. warrior ethos troubling. Good. As the most powerful nation in the world, we are obligated to undertake an open-minded examination and discussion of the ethical foundations and moral boundaries of the profession of arms, even if the process causes angst. Challans speaks to us from a unique background as a scholar, a warrior, and a philosopher, and his views should not be ignored. I strongly recommend that all members of the military profession read this text carefully and reflect on the important arguments found throughout. — LTC Paul Christopher, USA (Ret.), author of The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction to Legal and Moral Issues, Third Edition

“This is a groundbreaking and potentially controversial book in the context of professional military ethics. It fundamentally challenges the normal ways of teaching ethics in the military.” — Martin L. Cook, author of The Moral Warrior: Ethics and Service in the U.S. Military

Timothy L. Challans is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the School of Advanced Military Studies (SAMS).


Bookmark and Share

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments

1. THE UNREFLECTIVE LIFE: THE SLEEP OF REASON

The Myth of Moral Progress

2. THE PSEUDO-REFLECTIVE LIFE: BATTLE SLEEP

Reflection Deferred and Moral Error
Moral Authority
Lost in the Particulars
The Vices of Virtue
Is Moral Progress without Reflection Possible?

3. THE SEMI-REFLECTIVE LIFE: INSTRUMENTAL MEANS

Instrumental Means and Moral Error
Inadequate Decision Procedures
A Philosophical Critical Method
Disregarding Ends: When Means Become Ends
Are Moral Means Possible?

4. THE QUASI-REFLECTIVE LIFE: INADEQUATE ENDS

Inadequate Ends and Moral Error
Disregarding Means: When Ends Eclipse Means
Presumed Ends
Deliberating New Ends
Are Moral Ends Possible?

5. THE FULLY REFLECTIVE LIFE: AUTONOMY FOR AUTOMATONS

Autonomous Modes and Methods of Philosophical Ethics
The Ethical Principles of War
From Heteronomy to Autonomy: Reformulating Moral Intuitions
Moral Autonomy: Creating Better Understanding and Motivation
Is Moral Autonomy Possible?

6. THE FULLY REFLECTIVE LIFE AND MILITARY ETHICS

The Possibility of Moral Progress

Notes
Bibliography
About the Author
Index


Related Subjects
45807/45808(JFB/MS/FK)

Related Titles

Aristotle on Artifacts
Aristotle on Artifacts
The Difference Between Fichte's and Schelling's System of Philosophy
The Difference Between Fichte's and Schelling's System of Philosophy
The Rose Cross and the Age of Reason
The Rose Cross and the Age of Reason
The Logic of Marx's Capital
The Logic of Marx's Capital
In and About the World
In and About the World
Anti-Theory in Ethics and Moral Conservatism
Anti-Theory in Ethics and Moral Conservatism
Between Transcendence and Historicism
Between Transcendence and Historicism
Entanglements
Entanglements
Postmodernism and Continental Philosophy
Postmodernism and Continental Philosophy
The Limits of Knowledge
The Limits of Knowledge



 
bottom_1_963_35.jpg