top_1_963_35.JPG
top_2_1.jpg top_2_2.jpg
 
 
  HOME   PUBLISH   DONATE   ABOUT   CONTACT   HELP   SEARCH  
 
   
Human Experience
Philosophy, Neurosis, and the Elements of Everyday Life
Human Experience
Click on image to enlarge

John Russon - Author
SUNY series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy
N/A
Hardcover - 170 pages
Release Date: August 2003
ISBN10: 0-7914-5753-2
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-5753-5

Out of Print
Price: $26.95 
Paperback - 170 pages
Release Date: August 2003
ISBN10: 0-7914-5754-0
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-5754-2

Quantity:  
Available as a Google eBook
for other eReaders and tablet devices.
Click icon below...


Summary Read First Chapter image missing

Co-winner of the Canadian Philosophical Association’s 2005 Biennial Book Prize for the best philosophy book published in English

Proposes that philosophy is the proper cure for neurosis.

John Russon's Human Experience draws on central concepts of contemporary European philosophy to develop a novel analysis of the human psyche. Beginning with a study of the nature of perception, embodiment, and memory, Russon investigates the formation of personality through family and social experience. He focuses on the importance of the feedback we receive from others regarding our fundamental worth as persons, and on the way this interpersonal process embeds meaning into our most basic bodily practices: eating, sleeping, sex, and so on. Russon concludes with an original interpretation of neurosis as the habits of bodily practice developed in family interactions that have become the foundation for developed interpersonal life, and proposes a theory of psychological therapy as the development of philosophical insight that responds to these neurotic compulsions.

“…Human Experience is a genuine and original work of philosophy … It is exemplary in its clarity and rigor of expression.” — Continental Philosophy Review

"The book is persuasively insightful and an excellent translation of phenomenological-hermeneutical ideas, resonating with the works of Hegel, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and others, into a practical application concerning the nature of therapy." — Shaun Gallagher, editor of Hegel, History, and Interpretation

"This is a daring book. Russon has clearly challenged many prejudices. He describes experiences that question the prejudice about presence, about our bodies being mass or extension, about memory being subjective, and about the normal self being understood as a 'self-contained choosing power.'" — Leonard Lawlor, coeditor of Chiasms: Merleau-Ponty's Notion of Flesh

John Russon is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Guelph. He is the author of The Self and Its Body in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. He is also the coeditor (with John Sallis) of Retracing the Platonic Text and (with Michael Baur) Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H. S. Harris.


Bookmark and Share

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

PART I. The Form of Human Experience

1. Interpretation

2. Embodiment

3. Memory

PART II. The Substance of Human Experience

4. Others

5. Neurosis

PART III. The Process of Human Experience

6. Philosophy

Bibliography

Index



Related Subjects
41650/41651(JFB/KW/MC)

Related Titles

The Metaphysics of Evolution
The Metaphysics of Evolution
Philosophy of Science and Occult, 1st Ed.
Philosophy of Science and Occult, 1st Ed.
Pragmatism as a Principle and Method of Right Thinking
Pragmatism as a Principle and Method of Right Thinking
The Step Back
The Step Back
Reason and Relativism
Reason and Relativism
Plato's Laughter
Plato's Laughter
Logos and Muthos
Logos and Muthos
The Significance of Neoplatonism
The Significance of Neoplatonism
Complicated Presence
Complicated Presence
Genealogical Pragmatism
Genealogical Pragmatism



 
bottom_1_963_35.jpg