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Wittgenstein and Phenomenology
A Comparative Study of the Later Wittgenstein, Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty
Wittgenstein and Phenomenology
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Nicholas F. Gier - Author
SUNY Series in Philosophy
N/A
Hardcover - 268 pages
Release Date: June 1981
ISBN10: 0-87395-518-8
ISBN13: 978-0-87395-518-8

Out of Print
N/A
Paperback - 268 pages
Release Date: June 1981
ISBN10: 0-87395-519-6
ISBN13: 978-0-87395-519-5

Out of Print
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Summary

In the first in-depth philosophical study of the subject, Nicholas Gier examines the published and unpublished writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein, to show the striking parallels between Wittgenstein and phenomenology.  Between 1929 and 1933, the philosopher proposed programs that bore a detailed resemblance to dominant themes in the phenomenology of Husserl and some “life-world” phenomenologists. This sound, thoroughly readable study examines how and why he eventually moved away from it. Gier demonstrates, however, that Wittgenstein’s phenomenology continues as his “grammar” of the post-1933 works, which continue to present instructive parallels with Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty.

Nicholas F. Gier is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Idaho.



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