top_1_963_35.JPG
top_2_1.jpg top_2_2.jpg
 
 
  HOME   PUBLISH   DONATE   ABOUT   CONTACT   HELP   SEARCH  
 
   
Those Elegant Decorums
The Concept of Propriety in Jane Austen's Novels
Those Elegant Decorums
Click on image to enlarge

Jane Nardin - Author
Price: $29.50 
Hardcover - 178 pages
Release Date: June 1973
ISBN10: 0-87395-236-7
ISBN13: 978-0-87395-236-1

Quantity:  
Price: $25.95 
Paperback - 178 pages
Release Date: July 2011
ISBN10: N/A
ISBN13: 978-1-4384-4229-7

Quantity:  

Summary

Analyzes the way in which Austen blends ironic criticism with moral affirmation through her complex and little-understood management of the narrative point of view.

In Those Elegant Decorums Professor Nardin differs from the many critics who feel that Jane Austen's irony and her morality contradict each other. She analyzes the way in which Jane Austen blends ironic criticism with moral affirmation through her complex and little-understood management of the narrative point of view. She demonstrates that the reader takes a journey of perception similar to that of the central characters in the novels, and that the correct interpretation of events is often unclear until well after the fact, despite the seeming aid of an apparently unbiased, omniscient narrator.

Professor Nardin applies this general viewpoint on Jane Austen's art in her examination of the way Jane Austen uses ideas about propriety in her six novels. For Jane Austen, a person's social behavior--the code of propriety by which he lives--is the external manifestation of his internal moral character. What is the relationship between the conventionally accepted rules of propriety by which the gentry of Jane Austen's era regulated their lives and a morally valid standard of social behavior? This is an important question throughout Jane Austen's work. Those Elegant Decorums is a detailed study of the answers Jane Austen suggests in each novel.

Jane Nardin is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee.


Bookmark and Share

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

1. How to Read Jane Austen

2. The Concept of Propriety

3. Propriety as Duty to Society and Self: Sense and Sensibility

4. Propriety as a Test of Character: Pride and Prejudice

5. Propriety and the Education of Catherine Morland: Northanger Abbey

6. Status, Work, and Propriety in Mansfield Park

7. Egotism and Propriety in Emma

8. Propriety and the Exceptional Individual: Persuasion

Notes



Related Subjects
25373/4-4229-7(//)

Related Titles

The Hairpin Tax
The Hairpin Tax
Talking to the Gods
Talking to the Gods
The World of Yesterday's Humanist Today
The World of Yesterday's Humanist Today
Dead Reckoning
Dead Reckoning
Epic Grandeur
Epic Grandeur
Sweet Solitude
Sweet Solitude
Environmental Evasion
Environmental Evasion
Memory of Touch, For Love of the Other
Memory of Touch, For Love of the Other
Multiethnic Literature and Canon Debates
Multiethnic Literature and Canon Debates
Suffering and the Remedy of Art
Suffering and the Remedy of Art



 
bottom_1_963_35.jpg