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Overcoming Niagara
Canals, Commerce, and Tourism in the Niagara-Great Lakes Borderland Region, 1792–1837
Overcoming Niagara
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Janet Dorothy Larkin - Author
Price: $90.00 
Hardcover - 288 pages
Release Date: February 2018
ISBN10: N/A
ISBN13: 978-1-4384-6823-5

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Summary

Analyzes the nineteenth-century canal age in the Niagara–Great Lakes borderland region as a transnational phenomenon.


In Overcoming Niagara Janet Dorothy Larkin analyzes the canal age from the perspective of the Niagara–Great Lakes borderland between 1792 and 1837. She shows what drove the transportation revolution, not the conventional story of westward expansion and the international/metropolitan rivalry between Great Britain and the United States, but a dynamic connection, cooperation, and healthy competition in a transnational-borderland region. Larkin focuses on North America’s three most vital waterways—the Erie, Oswego, and Welland Canals. Canadian and American transportation leaders and promoters mutually sought to overcome the natural and artificial barriers presented by Niagara Falls by building an integrated, interconnected canal system, thus strengthening the borderland economy and propelling westward expansion, market development, and the Niagara tourist industry. On the heels of the Erie Canal’s bicentennial in 2017, Overcoming Niagara explores the transnational nature of the canal age within the Niagara–Great Lakes borderland, and its impact on the commercial and cultural landscape of this porous region.

Janet Dorothy Larkin has taught history at several colleges and universities and specializes in early nineteenth-century American history with a focus on the United States–Canada borderland.


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Related Subjects
4-6823-5/4-6824-2(AL/EM/FK)




 
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