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A Postcolonial Self
Korean Immigrant Theology and Church
A Postcolonial Self
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Hee An Choi - Author
Price: $75.00 
Hardcover - 196 pages
Release Date: September 2015
ISBN10: N/A
ISBN13: 978-1-4384-5735-2

Quantity:  
Price: $23.95 
Paperback - 196 pages
Release Date: July 2016
ISBN10: N/A
ISBN13: 978-1-4384-5736-9

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Summary Read First Chapter image missing

A theologically informed look at the postcolonial self that forms as Korean immigrants confront life in the United States.

Theologian Choi Hee An explores how Korean immigrants create a new, postcolonial identity in response to life in the United States. A Postcolonial Self begins with a discussion of a Korean ethnic self (“Woori” or “we”) and how it differs from Western norms. Choi then looks at the independent self, the theological debates over this concept, and the impact of racism, sexism, classism, and postcolonialism on the formation of this self. She concludes with a look at how Korean immigrants, especially immigrant women, cope with the transition to US culture, including prejudice and discrimination, and the role the Korean immigrant church plays in this. Choi posits that an emergent postcolonial self can be characterized as “I and We with Others.” In Korean immigrant theology and church, an extension of this can be characterized as “radical hospitality,” a concept that challenges both immigrants and American society to consider a new mutuality.

“…An offers a brilliant discussion … A Postcolonial Self is an outstanding book. An’s exploration of the evolution of the dynamic Korean ethnic self is creative and intriguing due to her deep understanding of Koreans and Korean history and her multi-disciplined analysis of the psychological factors of various historical and political circumstances. It is highly recommended for those with research interests in Korean immigrants in America, postcolonial studies, and feminist/womanist theology.” — Nova Religio

Choi Hee An is Clinical Assistant Professor of Practical Theology at Boston University School of Theology and the author of Korean Women and God: Experiencing God in a Multi-Religious Colonial Context.


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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction

1. A Korean Ethnic Self (We)

What Is Korean Ethnic Self?
A Korean Ethnic Self versus a Western Concept of the Self
A Korean Ethnic Self (We) in the Context of Christian Faith

2. A Marginalized Self (I as the Other versus We as the Other)

How Immigrants Experience Their Self
A Marginalized Self (I as the Other) in the Racial Formation
A Marginalized Self (I as the Other) in the Discourse of Sex/Gender
From a Marginalized Self (I as the Other) to a Marginalized Communal Self (We as the Other)

3. A Postcolonial Self (I and We with Others)

From a Marginalized Self to a Postcolonial Self (I and We with Others)
What Is a Postcolonial Self?
The Practice of a Postcolonial Self: Radical Hospitality

Conclusion

Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index


Related Subjects
4-5735-2/4-5736-9(NE/JMB/MC)

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