top_1_963_35.JPG
top_2_1.jpg top_2_2.jpg
 
 
  HOME   PUBLISH   DONATE   ABOUT   CONTACT   HELP   SEARCH  
 
   
Reconstructing the Confucian Dao
Zhu Xi's Appropriation of Zhou Dunyi
Reconstructing the Confucian Dao
Click on image to enlarge

Joseph A. Adler - Author
SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture
Price: $95.00 
Hardcover - 341 pages
Release Date: June 2014
ISBN10: N/A
ISBN13: 978-1-4384-5157-2

Quantity:  
Price: $26.95 
Paperback - 341 pages
Release Date: January 2015
ISBN10: N/A
ISBN13: 978-1-4384-5156-5

Quantity:  
Available within 2 month(s)
Billed when shipped
Price: $26.95 
Electronic - 341 pages
Release Date: March 2014
ISBN10: N/A
ISBN13: 978-1-4384-5158-9

Quantity: 
Before purchasing a SUNY Press PDF eBook
for the first time you must read this...

click here
Available as a Google eBook,
for other eReaders and tablet devices,
Click icon below...

Available on Kno platform as an interactive eBook for use on iPad, Web and Android devices. Click icon below...


Summary Read First Chapter image missing

Discusses how Zhou Dunyi’s thought became a cornerstone of neo-Confucianism.

Zhu Xi, the twelfth-century architect of the neo-Confucian canon, declared Zhou Dunyi to be the first true sage since Mencius. This was controversial, as many of Zhu Xi’s contemporaries were critical of Zhou Dunyi’s Daoist leanings, and other figures had clearly been more significant to the Song dynasty Confucian resurgence. Why was Zhou Dunyi accorded such importance? Joseph A. Adler finds that the earlier thinker provided an underpinning for Zhu Xi’s religious practice. Zhou Dunyi’s theory of the interpenetration of activity and stillness allowed Zhu Xi to proclaim that his own theory of mental and spiritual cultivation mirrored the fundamental principle immanent in the natural world. This book revives Zhu Xi as a religious thinker, challenging longstanding characterizations of him. Readers will appreciate the inclusion of complete translations of Zhou Dunyi’s major texts, Zhu Xi’s published commentaries, and other primary source material.

“It is a very ponderable book. I recommend it to those who like to read and think.” — Ralph Peterson, San Francisco Book Review

Joseph A. Adler is Professor of Asian Studies and Religious Studies at Kenyon College. He is the author of Chinese Religious Traditions.


Bookmark and Share

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Part I

Introduction

1. Zhu Xi, Zhou Dunyi, and the Confucian dao

2. Zhou Dunyi’s Role in the daotong

3. The Interpenetration of Activity and Stillness

4. Taiji as “Supreme Polarity”

Conclusions

Part II: Translations of Zhou Dunyi’s Major Works and Zhu Xi’s Commentaries, with Further Discussions by Zhu Xi and His Students

Introduction

5. The Supreme Polarity Diagram (Taijitu 太極圖)

6. Discussion of the Supreme Polarity Diagram (Taijitu sho 太極圖說)

7. Penetrating the Scripture of Change (Tongshu 通書)

8. Zhu Xi’s Postfaces and Notes

Bibliography
Index


Related Subjects
4-5157-2/4-5156-5(NE/LDS/MC)




 
bottom_1_963_35.jpg