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Doing Philosophy at the Movies
Doing Philosophy at the Movies
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Richard A. Gilmore - Author
Price: $75.50 
Hardcover - 195 pages
Release Date: March 2005
ISBN10: 0-7914-6391-5
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-6391-8

Quantity:  
Price: $31.95 
Paperback - 195 pages
Release Date: March 2005
ISBN10: 0-7914-6392-3
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-6392-5

Quantity:  
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Summary Read First Chapter image missing

Explores philosophical ideas through an examination of popular film.

Doing Philosophy at the Movies
finds the roots of profound philosophical ideas in the relatively ordinary context of popular, mostly Hollywood, movies. Richard A. Gilmore suggests that narratives of popular films like Hitchcock's Vertigo, John Ford's The Searchers, Woody Allen's Crimes and Misdemeanors, the Coen Brothers' Fargo, and Danny Boyle's Trainspotting mirror certain epiphanies in the works of great philosophers. Via Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, and Zizek, Gilmore addresses such themes as the nature of philosophy, the possibility of redemption through love, catharsis, the sublime, and the human problem of death. Gilmore argues that seeing these movies through the lens of certain philosophical ideas can show how deeply relevant both philosophy and the movies can be.

“Often what is to be learned from a film is openness to others, to new experiences, and to otherness itself; and openness turns out to be the very trait that Gilmore finds necessary to film appreciation … much may be learned here about viewing films philosophically.” — CHOICE

"Gilmore has a distinctive take on the relationship between philosophy and film. Using the work of Stanley Cavell as his basis, Gilmore argues that popular films can be a means by which people can experience the pleasures and rewards of philosophy." — Thomas E. Wartenberg, author of Unlikely Couples: Movie Romance as Social Criticism

"Gilmore perspicuously represents how popular movies actually offer us thoughtful attempts to come to grips with those issues that most profoundly trouble us. He offers startlingly insightful remarks and observations about film and brings out how our quotidian lives can be intensely philosophical without our even being aware." — Dan Flory, Montana State University at Bozeman

Richard A. Gilmore is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Concordia College and the author of Philosophical Health: Wittgenstein's Method in "Philosophical Investigations."


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Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

Introduction: What It Means to Do Philosophy

1. John Ford's The Searchers as an Allegory of the Philosophical Search

2. A The Usual Suspects Moment in Vertigo: The Epistemology of Identity

3. The American Sublime in Fargo

4. Visions of Meaning: Seeing and Non-Seeing in Woody Allen's Crimes and Misdemeanors

5. Oedipus Techs: Time Travel as Redemption in The Terminator and 12 Monkeys

6. Into the Toilet: Some Classical Aesthetic Themes Raised by a Scene in Trainspotting

7. Horror and Death at the Movies

Conclusion: The Dialectics of Interpretation

Notes

Index



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43823/43824(JFB/MS/SP)

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