top_1_963_35.JPG
top_2_1.jpg top_2_2.jpg
 
 
  HOME   PUBLISH   DONATE   ABOUT   CONTACT   HELP   SEARCH  
 
   
Recreational Terror
Women and the Pleasures of Horror Film Viewing
Recreational Terror
Click on image to enlarge

Isabel Cristina Pinedo - Author
SUNY series, INTERRUPTIONS: Border Testimony(ies) and Critical Discourse/s
Price: $50.50 
Hardcover - 177 pages
Release Date: July 1997
ISBN10: 0-7914-3441-9
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-3441-3

Quantity:  
Price: $26.95 
Paperback - 177 pages
Release Date: July 1997
ISBN10: 0-7914-3442-7
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-3442-0

Quantity:  
Available as a Google eBook
for other eReaders and tablet devices.
Click icon below...


Summary Read First Chapter image missing

Challenges the conventional wisdom that violent horror films can only degrade women and incite violence.

"This book makes an important contribution to the study of the horror film, a field loaded with articles and texts but without the clear direction given it in Pinedo's fine study. Pinedo has seen some 600 films, and the wealth of this experience is reflected in the book. She makes distinctions that are neither obvious nor trivial, and 'reads' these films as texts with the sophistication of someone whose interdisciplinary background includes film studies, sociology, and psychoanalysis. Her insistence on contextualizing both the films and what has been said about them by reviewers and film critics and theorists is consistent with the best work now being done by social scientists, historians, literary scholars, and students of film." -- Michael E. Brown, Northeastern University

In Recreational Terror, Isabel Cristina Pinedo analyzes how the contemporary horror film produces recreational terror as a pleasurable encounter with violence and danger for female spectators. She challenges the conventional wisdom that violent horror films can only degrade women and incite violence, and contends instead that the contemporary horror film speaks to the cultural need to express rage and terror in the midst of social upheaval.

Through interpretations of a number of horror films including The Thing, The Wizard of Gore, The Stepfather, and Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, Pinedo looks at how the postmodern elements of the contemporary horror film produce the conditions for recreational terror.

Isabel Cristina Pinedo is Assistant Professor of Media and Cultural Studies in the Department of Communications at Hunter College of the City University of New York.


Bookmark and Share

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. Recreational Terror and the Postmodern Elements of the Contemporary Horror Film

2. The Pleasure of Seeing/Not Seeing the Spectacle of the Wet Death

3. . . . And Then She Killed Him: Women and Violence in the Slasher FIlm

4. The Culture Politics of the Postmodern Horror Film

5. Race Horror

Afterword

Notes

Bibliography

Films Cited

Index



Related Subjects
33125/33126(PR/MS/)

Related Titles

Remaking the Frankenstein Myth on Film
Remaking the Frankenstein Myth on Film
Celluloid Nationalism and Other Melodramas
Celluloid Nationalism and Other Melodramas
Irish and African American Cinema
Irish and African American Cinema
Seoul Searching
Seoul Searching
Memory's Orbit
Memory's Orbit
Triangulated Visions
Triangulated Visions
John Huston as Adaptor
John Huston as Adaptor
This Is a Picture and Not the World
This Is a Picture and Not the World
Are You Watching Closely?
Are You Watching Closely?
The Death of Classical Cinema
The Death of Classical Cinema



 
bottom_1_963_35.jpg