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Democratic Miners
Work and Labor Relations in the Anthracite Coal Industry, 1875-1925
Democratic Miners
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Perry K. Blatz - Author
SUNY series in American Labor History
Price: $57.50 
Hardcover - 368 pages
Release Date: April 1994
ISBN10: 0-7914-1819-7
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-1819-2

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Price: $31.95 
Paperback - 368 pages
Release Date: March 1994
ISBN10: 0-7914-1820-0
ISBN13: 978-0-7914-1820-8

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“Perry K. Blatz has written a solid account of labor-management relations in the anthracite coal fields. It is a study that vividly displays the dynamic interrelationship between capital, labor, and the state on a regional basis....It is well-researched, well-written, and a much-needed study of an important period of American labor history.” —American Historical Review

“I heartily recommend this book, not just for those interested in learning more about the UMWA, or the anthracite coal industry, but for anyone who wants to know more about the sources of union growth in America.” — David Witwer, Lycoming College

“Blatz skillfully situates his study within the context of what he calls the 'capriciousness and complexity' of the work process. This study not only expands our understanding of the interrelationship between capital, labor, and the state, but also illuminates the gap between workers and their unions. Based on a broad range of primary and secondary sources, it covers the attitudes and behavior of ordinary anthracite miners, union leaders, managers, and government officials.” — Joe W. Trotter, Carnegie Mellon University

Democratic Miners traces the history of work and labor relations in the anthracite coal industry, focusing on conditions that led up to, and followed, the famous strike of 1902. That strike, an epic five-and-a-half-month struggle, led the federal government to intervene in a labor dispute for the first time in American history. Focusing on the workplace, Blatz puts the 1902 strike in the context of a turbulent half-century of labor-management relations. Those years saw the unionization of the anthracite fields under the United Mine Workers of America, amidst an evolving democratic tradition of rank-and-file protest against corporate control, and ironically ended with a growing rift between miners and union leadership.

Unlike many books on labor relations, this work concentrates especially on the workers themselves. Working-class as opposed to union history, it contributes greatly to our understanding of working-class formation in the Progressive years.

Perry K. Blatz is Assistant Professor of History and Director of the graduate program in Archival, Museum, and Editing Studies at Duquesne University.


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Table of Contents

List of Figures

List of Tables

Preface

INTRODUCTION

1. CAPRICIOUSNESS AND COMPLEXITY: THE INSECURITY OF ANTHRACITE MINE WORKERS

2. THE FAILURE OF LABOR ORGANIZATION, 1875–1897

3. MILITANCY AND OPPORTUNITY, 1897–1899

4. "ONWARD MARCH": THE STRIKE OF 1900

5. CRISIS OF AUTHORITY

6. THE STRIKE OF 1902

7. THE ANTHRACITE COAL STRIKE COMMISSION

8. TWILIGHT BARGAINING: 1903–1906

9. DEMORALIZATION AND REBIRTH, 1906–1916

10. INSURGENCY AND DEMOCRACY, 1917–1925

EPILOGUE

NOTES

SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY


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22063/23371(CM/CL/)

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