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4 Results Found For: William Egginton
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Borges, Second Edition
Borges, Second Edition (April 2014)
The Passion of an Endless Quotation
Lisa Block de Behar - Author
William Egginton - Translator
Christopher RayAlexander - With

Expanded edition with new chapters and updates to the translation and bibliography.

Borges cites innumerable authors in the pages making up his life’s work, and innumerable authors have cited and continue to cite him. More than a figure, then, the quotation is an integral part of the fabric of his writing, a fabric made anew by each reading and each re-citation it undergoes, in the never-ending throes of a w...(Read More)
 
 
The Pragmatic Turn in Philosophy
The Pragmatic Turn in Philosophy (April 2004)
Contemporary Engagements between Analytic and Continental Thought
William Egginton - Editor
Mike Sandbothe - Editor

Demonstrates that the divisions between analytic and continental philosophy are being replaced by a transcontinental desire to address common problems in a common idiom.

The Pragmatic Turn in Philosophy
explores how the various discursive strategies of old and new pragmatisms are related, and what their pertinence is to the relationship between pragmatism and philosophy as a whole. The contributors bridge the divide ...(Read More)
 
 
Borges
Borges (October 2002)
The Passion of an Endless Quotation
Lisa Block de Behar - Author
William Egginton - Translation and introduction by

Lisa Block de Behar explores the trope of quotation in the works of Jorge Luis Borges.

“Barthes once wrote that the only way to read a work of passion is with another work of passion. What was true for Barthes is equally true for Lisa Block de Behar, whose three or more decades of scholarly activity have produced an imposing body of scholarship on the work of Jorge Luis Borges, but more importantly and more urgen...(Read More)
 
 
How the World Became a Stage
How the World Became a Stage (October 2002)
Presence, Theatricality, and the Question of Modernity
William Egginton - Author

Argues that the experience of modernity is fundamentally spatial rather than subjective.

What is special, distinct, modern about modernity? In How the World Became a Stage, William Egginton argues that the experience of modernity is fundamentally spatial rather than subjective and proposes replacing the vocabulary of subjectivity with the concepts of presence and theatricality. Following a Heideggerian injuncti...(Read More)
 
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