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The Flood Myths of Early China
The Flood Myths of Early China (February 2006)
Mark Edward Lewis - Author

Explores how the flood myths of early China provided a template for that society’s major social and political institutions.

Early Chinese ideas about the construction of an ordered human space received narrative form in a set of stories dealing with the rescue of the world and its inhabitants from a universal flood. This book demonstrates how early Chinese stories of the re-creation of the world from a watery chao...(Read More)
 
 
The Construction of Space in Early China
The Construction of Space in Early China (December 2005)
Mark Edward Lewis - Author

Shows how the emerging Chinese empire purposely reconceived but was also constrained by basic spatial units such as the body, the household, the region, and the world.

This book examines the formation of the Chinese empire through its reorganization and reinterpretation of its basic spatial units: the human body, the household, the city, the region, and the world. The central theme of the book is the way all these for...(Read More)
 
 
Writing and Authority in Early China
Writing and Authority in Early China (April 1999)
Mark Edward Lewis - Author

Traces the evolving uses of writing to command assent and authority in early China, an evolution that culminated in the establishment of a textual canon as the basis of imperial authority.

"This book is a masterful study of the ideology and uses of writing in early China. The scholarship is impeccable--indeed, stunning--the interpretation of an array of difficult texts is brilliant, and the conclusions are of central importance...(Read More)
 
 
Sanctioned Violence in Early China
Sanctioned Violence in Early China (August 1989)
Mark Edward Lewis - Author

This book provides new insight into the creation of the Chinese empire by examining the changing forms of permitted violence--warfare, hunting, sacrifice, punishments, and vengeance. It analyzes the interlinked evolution of these violent practices to reveal changes in the nature of political authority, in the basic units of social organization, and in the fundamental commitments of the ruling elite. The work offers a new interpretation of the ch...(Read More)
 
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