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173 Results Found For: SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture
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Translating China for Western Readers
Translating China for Western Readers (January 2015)
Reflective, Critical, and Practical Essays
Ming Dong Gu - Editor
Rainer Schulte - With

Explores the challenges of translating Chinese works for Western readers, particularly premodern texts.

This book explores the challenges of translating Chinese works, particularly premodern ones, for a contemporary Western readership. Reacting against the “cultural turn” in translation studies, contributors return to the origin of translation studies: translation practice. By returning to the time-honored basics of l...(Read More)
 
 
Whose Tradition? Which Dao?
Whose Tradition? Which Dao? (January 2015)
Confucius and Wittgenstein on Moral Learning and Reflection
James F. Peterman - Author

Considers the notable similarities between the thought of Confucius and Wittgenstein.

In an incisive work of comparative philosophy, James F. Peterman considers the similarities between early Chinese ethicist Confucius and mid-twentieth century philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. Their enduring legacies rest in no small part on projects to restore humanity to healthy ways of living and thinking. Confucius offers a method of answerin...(Read More)
 
 
Red God
Red God (December 2014)
Wei Baqun and His Peasant Revolution in Southern China, 1894-1932
Xiaorong Han - Author

The career of communist revolutionary Wei Baqun, one of China’s “three great peasant leaders” and man of the southern frontier.

Robin Hood–style revolutionary Wei Baqun is often described as one of China’s “three great peasant leaders,” alongside Mao Zedong and Peng Pai. In his home county of Donglan, where he started organizing peasants in the early 1920s, Wei Baqun came ...(Read More)
 
 
Why Be Moral?
Why Be Moral? (November 2014)
Learning from the Neo-Confucian Cheng Brothers
Yong Huang - Author

Explores the resources for contemporary ethics found in the work of the Cheng brothers, canonical neo-Confucian philosophers.
Yong Huang presents a new way of doing comparative philosophy as he demonstrates the resources for contemporary ethics offered by the Cheng brothers, Cheng Hao (1032–1085) and Cheng Yi (1033–1107), canonical neo-Confucian philosophers. Huang departs from the standard method of Chinese/Western c...(Read More)
 
 
Moral Cultivation and Confucian Character
Moral Cultivation and Confucian Character (September 2014)
Engaging Joel J. Kupperman
Chenyang Li - Editor
Peimin Ni - Editor

A consideration of Confucian ethics that employs the work and concerns of the eminent comparative ethicist Joel J. Kupperman.

In this volume, leading scholars in Asian and comparative philosophy take the work of Joel J. Kupperman as a point of departure to consider new perspectives on Confucian ethics. Kupperman is one of the few eminent Western philosophers to have integrated Asian philosophical traditions into ...(Read More)
 
 
These Bones Shall Rise Again
These Bones Shall Rise Again (September 2014)
Selected Writings on Early China
David N. Keightley - Author
Henry Rosemont Jr. - Edited and with an introduction by

David N. Keightley’s seminal essays on the origins of Chinese society are brought together in one volume.
These Bones Shall Rise Again brings together in one volume many of David N. Keightley’s seminal essays on the origins of early Chinese civilization. Written over a period of three decades and accessible to the non-specialist, these essays provide a wealth of information and insights on the Shang dynasty, ...(Read More)
 
 
Ritual and Religion in the Xunzi
Ritual and Religion in the Xunzi (June 2014)
T. C. Kline III - Editor
Justin Tiwald - Editor

Challenges traditional views to consider Xunzi as a religious thinker.
Xunzi, a founding figure in the Confucian tradition, is one of the world’s great philosophers and theorists of religion. For much of the last century, his work has been seen largely as critical of religion, particularly the popular beliefs and invocations of supernatural forces that underpin so many religious rituals. Contributors to this volume challeng...(Read More)
 
 
Reconstructing the Confucian Dao
Reconstructing the Confucian Dao (June 2014)
Zhu Xi's Appropriation of Zhou Dunyi
Joseph A. Adler - Author

Discusses how Zhou Dunyi’s thought became a cornerstone of neo-Confucianism.

Zhu Xi, the twelfth-century architect of the neo-Confucian canon, declared Zhou Dunyi to be the first true sage since Mencius. This was controversial, as many of Zhu Xi’s contemporaries were critical of Zhou Dunyi’s Daoist leanings, and other figures had clearly been more significant to the Song dynasty Confucian resurg...(Read More)
 
 
Moral Relativism and Chinese Philosophy
Moral Relativism and Chinese Philosophy (March 2014)
David Wong and His Critics
Yang Xiao - Editor
Yong Huang - Editor

A wide-ranging consideration of the work of contemporary ethicist David Wong.

Original, influential, and often controversial, ethicist David Wong defends forms of moral relativism. His 1984 Moral Relativity was a study of this concept, and his 2006 Natural Moralities presented a new and sophisticated account of it. Wong’s vision is of a pluralistic moral relativism; he does not defend all f...(Read More)
 
 
Witchcraft and the Rise of the First Confucian Empire
Witchcraft and the Rise of the First Confucian Empire (February 2014)
Liang Cai - Author

FINALIST - 2015 Best First Book in the History of Religions, presented by the American Academy of Religion

2014 Academic Award for Excellence, presented by Chinese Historians in the United States


Contests long-standing claims that Confucianism came to prominence under China’s Emperor Wu.

When did Confucianism become the reigning political ideology of imperial China? A pervasive narra...(Read More)
 
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