top_1_963_35.JPG
top_2_1.jpg top_2_2.jpg
 
 
  HOME   PUBLISH   DONATE   ABOUT   CONTACT   HELP   SEARCH  
 
   
Search Results
28 Results Found For: German Culture
Display Text Only Results
Page: 1  2  3  Amount of Results to Show: Sort by:
 
Anti-Music
Anti-Music (June 2018)
Jazz and Racial Blackness in German Thought between the Wars
Mark Christian Thompson - Author

Examines how African American jazz music was received in Germany both as a racial and cultural threat and as a partner in promoting the rise of Nazi totalitarian cultural politics.

Anti-Music examines the critical, literary, and political responses to African American jazz music in interwar Germany. During this time, jazz was the subject of overt political debate between left-wing and right-wing interests: for the left, ja...(Read More)
 
 
The Politics of Unreason
The Politics of Unreason (September 2017)
The Frankfurt School and the Origins of Modern Antisemitism
Lars Rensmann - Author

The first systematic analysis of the Frankfurt School’s research and theorizing on modern antisemitism.
Although the Frankfurt School represents one of the most influential intellectual traditions of the twentieth century, its multifaceted work on modern antisemitism has so far largely been neglected. The Politics of Unreason fills this gap, providing the first systematic study of the Frankfurt School’s philos...(Read More)
 
 
East German Historians since Reunification
East German Historians since Reunification (July 2017)
A Discipline Transformed
Axel Fair-Schulz - Editor
Mario Kessler - Editor

Surveys how reunification in 1990 impacted historical scholarship in the former East Germany.

With German reunification and the demise of the German Democratic Republic in 1990, East German historians and their traditions of historiography were removed from mainstream discourse in Germany and relegated to the periphery. By the mid-1990s, few GDR-trained historians remained in academia. These developments led to...(Read More)
 
 
Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation Reconsidered
Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation Reconsidered (September 2016)
Daniel Breazeale - Editor
Tom Rockmore - Editor

Essays on one of J. G. Fichte’s best-known and most controversial works.

One of J. G. Fichte’s best-known works, Addresses to the German Nation is based on a series of speeches he gave in Berlin when the city was under French occupation. They feature Fichte’s diagnosis of his own era in European history as well as his call for a new sense of German national identity, based upon a common language and cul...(Read More)
 
 
Desiring Emancipation
Desiring Emancipation (July 2014)
New Women and Homosexuality in Germany, 1890-1933
Marti M. Lybeck - Author

Uses historical case studies to illuminate women’s claims to emancipation and to sexual subjectivity during the tumultuous Wilhelmine and Weimar periods in Germany.

Desiring Emancipation traces middle-class German women’s claims to gender emancipation and sexual subjectivity in the pre-Nazi era. The emergence of homosexual identities and concepts in this same time frame provided the context f...(Read More)
 
 
Redeeming Words
Redeeming Words (November 2013)
Language and the Promise of Happiness in the Stories of Döblin and Sebald
David Michael Kleinberg-Levin - Author

Probing study of how literature can redeem the revelatory, redemptive powers of language.

In this probing look at Alfred Döblin’s 1929 novel Berlin Alexanderplatz and the stories of W. G. Sebald, Redeeming Words offers a philosophical meditation on the power of language in literature. David Kleinberg-Levin draws on the critical theory of Benjamin and Adorno; the idealism and romantic...(Read More)

 
 
The German Invention of Race
The German Invention of Race (February 2006)
Sara Eigen - Editor
Mark Larrimore - Editor

Illuminates the emergence of race as a central concept in philosophy and the social sciences.

In The German Invention of Race, historians, philosophers, and scholars in literary, cultural, and religious studies trace the origins of the concept of “race” to Enlightenment Germany and seek to understand the issues at work in creating a definition of race. The work introduces a significant connection to th...(Read More)
 
 
Become Who You Are
Become Who You Are (November 2005)
Hedwig Dohm - Author
Elizabeth G. Ametsbichler - Translation and afterword by

Two texts—one novella and one essay—that exemplify Dohm’s passionate arguments for gender equality.

Hedwig Dohm (1831–1919) was a thinker and writer significantly ahead of her time. She championed women’s rights in Germany and criticized with acerbic wit the social, political, and familial inequities inherent in gender relationships at the time of the first wave of the women’s movem...(Read More)
 
 
Rhine Crossings
Rhine Crossings (May 2005)
France and Germany in Love and War
Aminia M. Brueggemann - Editor
Peter Schulman - Editor

Explores the unique and volatile relationship of these two nations and cultures over the past two centuries, as expressed in literature, film, and philosophy.

Rhine Crossings
explores the conflicts and resolutions that have characterized the relationship between France and Germany over the past two centuries. Despite their varying outlooks on life and style (the French esprit and the German wesen), and de...(Read More)
 
 
Facing Fascism and Confronting the Past
Facing Fascism and Confronting the Past (June 2000)
German Women Writers from Weimar to the Present
Elke P. Frederiksen - Editor
Martha Kaarsberg Wallach - Editor

Examines German women's literary and cultural representations of the Nazi era.

Spanning almost the entire twentieth century, from the 1920s to the 1990s, this book gives voice to both Jewish and non-Jewish women writers from German-speaking countries who were silenced during the Nazi years. Discussions on gender, patriarchy, and fascism are brought to bear on the works of Nelly Sachs, Anna Seghers, Elisabeth Langgass...(Read More)
 
Page: 1  2  3  Amount of Results to Show: Sort by:
 
bottom_1_963_35.jpg