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Plato and the Body
Plato and the Body (August 2018)
Reconsidering Socratic Asceticism
Coleen P. Zoller - Author

 
 
Plato's Laughter
Plato's Laughter (December 2017)
Socrates as Satyr and Comical Hero
Sonja Madeleine Tanner - Author

Counters the long-standing, solemn interpretation of Plato’s dialogues with one centered on the philosophical and pedagogical significance of Socrates as a comic figure.

Plato was described as a boor and it was said that he never laughed out loud. Yet his dialogues abound with puns, jokes, and humor. Sonja Madeleine Tanner argues that in Plato’s dialogues Socrates plays a comical hero who draws heavi...(Read More)
 
 
Cleansing the Temple: Dante, Defender of the Church
Cleansing the Temple: Dante, Defender of the Church (November 2017)
Bernardo Lecture Series, No. 20
Ronald L. Martinez - Author
Olivia Holmes - Editor

Dante as protector and purifier of the Church.

Readers of the Commedia are familiar with Dante’s severe judgment of contemporary popes. The attacks are explicable as part of Dante’s strategy of defending the Church itself, which the poet saw as imperiled by papal avarice and political ambition. From the reference to the biblical punishment of Uzzah for touching the Ark of the Covenant in Epistola XI, ur...(Read More)
 
 
Report on the Aeginetan Sculptures
Report on the Aeginetan Sculptures (June 2017)
With Historical Supplements
Johann Martin Wagner - Author
F. W. J. Schelling - Editor
Louis A. Ruprecht Jr. - Translated, edited, and with an introduction by

Tells the story of Bavaria’s acquisition of ancient Greek sculptures that rivaled those acquired by England from the Parthenon.

The controversial removal of the Parthenon sculptures from Greece to England in the first decade of the nineteenth century by Thomas Bruce, seventh Earl of Elgin, sparked an international competition for classical antiquities. This volume tells a lesser-known chapter of that story...(Read More)
 
 
Rational Spirituality and Divine Virtue in Plato
Rational Spirituality and Divine Virtue in Plato (May 2016)
A Modern Interpretation and Philosophical Defense of Platonism
Michael LaFargue - Author

Describes a Platonic personal spirituality based on reason that is readily accessible to people today.

Michael LaFargue presents an important and accessible aspect of Plato’s legacy largely overlooked today: a variety of personal spirituality based on reason and centered on virtue. Plato’s Virtue-Forms are transcendent in their goodness, ideals that Platonists can use to improve character ...(Read More)
 
 
"Favola fui": Petrarch Writes His Readers (November 2010)
Bernardo Lecture Series, No. 17
Albert Russell Ascoli - Author
Dana E. Stewart - Editor

Examines the interplay between reading and writing in the works of Petrarch and Dante.
Building upon his 2008 book Dante and the Making of a Modern Author, Albert Russell Ascoli here reflects on the extent to which Petrarch’s addresses to and figurations of his relationship to his readers intersect with the oft-asserted “modernity” of his authorial stances. In particular, Ascoli argues that following in the wake of Dante’...(Read More)
 
 
Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment
Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment (March 2010)
On Plato's Symposium
Steven Berg - Author

Provocative reinterpretation of Plato’s Symposium.

An original analysis of one of Plato’s most well-known and pivotal dialogues, this study is based upon the effort to think together the most manifest themes of the Symposium (the nature of eros and the relation between poetry and philosophy) with its less obvious but no less essential themes (the character of the city and the nature and limi...(Read More)
 
 
The Wound and the Witness
The Wound and the Witness (February 2009)
The Rhetoric of Torture
Jennifer R. Ballengee - Author

Explores the rhetorical functions of torture and the witnessing of torture in both classical texts and contemporary contexts.

The Wound and the Witness offers a historically grounded approach to an urgent contemporary problem: the persistence of torture in Western culture. Drawing upon ancient Greek and Roman texts, as well as contemporary media events, Jennifer R. Ballengee explores the spectacle of torture...(Read More)
 
 
From Divine to Human: Dante's Circle vs. Boccaccio's Parodic Centers
From Divine to Human: Dante's Circle vs. Boccaccio's Parodic Centers (January 2009)
Bernardo Lecture Series, No. 16
Dino S. Cervigni - Author
Dana E. Stewart - Editor

In Boccacio’s Decameron, Cervigni sees a parodic echo of the circles of Dante’s Divine Comedy, and asks whether Bocaccio envisions the voyage of the brigata as similar to Dante the Pilgrim’s journey toward the center, first the abysmal center of Lucifer, then towards the highest center, God.

From Divine to Human is the sixteenth in a seriesof publications occ...(Read More)
 
 
The Future of Invention
The Future of Invention (April 2008)
Rhetoric, Postmodernism, and the Problem of Change
John Muckelbauer - Author

Examines the concept of rhetorical invention from an affirmative, nondialectical perspective.

The Future of Invention links classical rhetorical practices of invention with the philosophical work of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Derrida and proposes that some of the most crucial implications of postmodern theory have gone largely unattended. Drawing on such classical rhetorical concepts as doxa, i...(Read More)
 
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